Plenary Speakers

Alan G. Marshall, PhD

Founding Director and Chief Scientist, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Ion Cyclotron Resonance Program, and Robert O. Lawton Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Florida State University
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Topic:
An Olio of Omics: Nature’s Chemical Compositional Complexity Resolved and Identified by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

Most mass analysis relies on “nominal” mass accuracy (i.e., to within 1 Da).  However, more and more applications are based on much more accurate mass measurement.  Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry… Learn More

Date / Time
Wednesday, 31 October 2018, 5:30 – 6:30pm

Dr. Cato Laurencin

Cato T. Laurencin, MD, PhD

Dr. Laurencin is a designated University Professor at the University of Connecticut. He is the Albert and Wilda Van Dusen Distinguished Endowed Chair Professor of Orthopedic Surgery in the School of Medicine. In addition, Dr. Laurencin is Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Professor of Materials Engineering and Professor of Biomedical Engineering at UConn. Dr. Laurencin serves as Chief Executive Officer of the Connecticut Institute for Clinical and Translational Science. He is the Founding Director of the Institute for Regenerative Engineering and the Founding Director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Center for Biomedical, Biological, Physical and Engineering Sciences at UConn Health. He was awarded the 2016 National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama.
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Topic:
Regenerative Engineering: Convergence of Material Importance

We define Regenerative Engineering as the Convergence of Advanced Materials Science, Stem Cell Science, Physics, Developmental Biology, and Clinical Translation for the regeneration of complex tissues, organs and organ systems. Biomaterials play a centrally important role… Learn More

Date / Time
Thursday, 1 November 2018, 5:30 – 6:30pm

Jillian Buriak

Jillian Buriak, PhD

Professor of Chemistry, University of Alberta; Canada Research Chair of Nanomaterials for Energy; AITF Industry Chair of Sun-Powered Generation of Fuels and Power; Editor-in-Chief, Chemistry of Materials.
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Topic:
Patterning with Polymers and Plasmons

The semiconductor industry uses the term directed self-assembly, or DSA, in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) to describe the use of self-assembly of block copolymers to generate nanopatterns on semiconductor surfaces as a… Learn More

Date / Time
Friday, 2 November 2018, 5:30 – 6:30pm

Dale Ensor

Dale Ensor, PhD – Undergraduate Plenary

Dr. Dale D. Ensor is an Emeritus Professor of Chemistry at Tennessee Technological University. He has been a visiting scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Ensor has over 40 years of research experience in nuclear and radiochemistry and has a passion for the history of radiochemistry. His talks are both technical and incorporate stories that illustrate the personal sides of the scientists.

Topic:

The Road to Trinity Site: Project Y and the Manhattan Project
In early spring 1943, young scientists from all over the country were given instructions to report to 109 East Palace Ave. in Santa Fe, NM. They were told only that they would be working on a project that could shorten the war, if successful. The Manhattan Project was already underway, building two large industrial complexes in Tennessee (Project X) and Washington (Project W). Project Y, now known as Los Alamos, was the laboratory for the design and construction of the “gadget.” The former Los Alamos Ranch School for Boys was transformed into a complex of over 6,500 scientists and support personnel and would produce the atomic weapons that ended WWII. This presentation will focus on the building of the laboratory, the science that was accomplished, and its director, J. Robert Oppenheimer. An understanding of life on the “The Hill” will be illustrated through stories focusing on the interactions among scientists, their families, and the Army. The contributions of famous scientists who came to the “The Hill,” like Fermi and Bohr, and those of young scientists, such as Serber, Feynman, and Frisch, will be highlighted. The culmination of the efforts at Los Alamos was the successful test of the world’s first atomic bomb at Trinity Site on July 16, 1945.

Date / Time
Saturday, 3 November 2018, 8:30am – 9:45am